University of Delaware - College of Engineering
ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Academics - Undergraduate Program

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How can I find out who my advisor is?

A: Check on UDSIS (Student Information System), log in and under your Student Center tab on the right-hand side, you will see ADVISOR.

Q: I'm having trouble reaching my advisor. What can I do?

A: After you locate your advisor in UDSIS, there is a link that says 'details'. Choose this link and you can email your advisor. You can also call on the phone or drop by his/her office. Faculty members often receive a huge volume of email. Sometimes they will reply promptly to email and sometimes they are unable to reply as promptly as you would like. If you don't get a response in the time frame you need, please contact Debbie Nelson, Academic Advisor I, at 302.831.3275 or dnelson@udel.edu and she will assist you in contacting your advisor or answer your questions/concerns.

Q: What minimum grade must I get in CISC 106, 181, 220 and 361?

A: The Computer Information Sciences department requires a C- or better in CISC 106, 181, 220 and 361; therefore, you must meet this requirement for your Electrical or Computer Engineering major as well. Otherwise, a student must pass the core courses in Electrical and Computer Engineering majors with a D- or better and your CUM GPA must be at least a 2.0. A D- is considered a passing grade. University Breadth courses must be passed with a C- or better.

Q: I placed out of MATH 241 (or PHYS 207, or CISC 106, etc.) with AP credit.  What should I take in its place?

A: In general, if you place out of a course with high school (or transfer) credits, you should take the next course in the sequence.  A first semester freshman having placed out of MATH 241 will thus generally take MATH 242 in his/her first semester, and be one semester ahead in the math sequence.  Once the end of that sequence is reached, (in this case the student will complete MATH 342 at the end of the sophomore year) there will be a hole (in this case, the rest of the junior class will take MATH 342 in the first semester of the year).  This hole can be filled with a breadth class or technical elective.

Q: Where can I get extra help?

A: Asking for some extra help is the smart thing to do if you find you are having difficulty with a course or with a particular topic or problem. The first person to turn to is the instructor of the class. He or she will usually be pleased that a student is concerned enough to ask for clarification or further explanation of a concept or for a diagnosis of problems that arise on tests and papers. Additional resources are available if help is needed over a longer term. The Office of Academic Enrichment (OAE) is an academic support office of the University of Delaware and their mission is to assist undergraduate students in the pursuit of academic success. OAE provides individual tutoring, drop-in tutoring, group tutoring, supplemental instruction, one-on-one academic assistance, etc. Another resource is free tutoring that is provided by the Eta Kappa Nu Honor Society. The free tutoring is offered during the fall and spring semesters and typically an email is sent to all undergraduates apprising them of the details of tutoring sessions.

Q: What are “technical electives?”

A: General technical electives (those classes labeled technical elective on the sample curriculum) are classes of 300 or 400 level in engineering, computer science, or the natural or mathematical sciences.  There are a few exceptions to this rule (for instance, classes that study societal impacts of engineering or science are not generally counted.)  A list of pre-approved technical electives may be found here.  Other classes, labeled ELEG/CPEG 3xx/4xx and ELEG/CPEG 4xx, are also sometimes called technical electives, but these must be chosen from among the department’s courses.

Q: Do I need to take the elective courses in the order they are prescribed on the sample curriculum?

A: No.  While the sample curricula list the general technical electives before the ELEG/CPEG technical electives, there is no requirement that you do things in this order.  (The sample curricular are just examples of how the required classes can be fit together to graduate in four years.)  Moreover, there is no rule that says you must take the foundation electives before you take real technical electives, but some technical electives will require certain foundation electives.  Because the foundation electives are (almost) specific courses required for graduation, it is a good idea to take them as early as possible.

Q: Are there any additional foundation electives besides the ones listed that count?

A: In addition to the five approved foundation electives (ELEG 306, 312, 403, 413 and 418), a student may also take ELEG 456, Electric Power II (ELEG 415, Electrical Power & Renewable Energy Systems is a prerequisite); and ELEG 492, Radar Systems & Technology.

Q: Which foundation electives are offered in the fall and which are offered in the spring?

A: ELEG 306, 312, 403 and 418 are offered in the fall and ELEG 413, 456 and 492 are offered in the spring.

Q: What is the senior design (capstone course) sequence?

A: Computer Engineering majors take CPEG 498 in the fall and CPEG 499 in the spring. Electrical Engineering majors take ELEG 498 in the fall and ELEG 499 in the spring. The department also offers an honors section for both CPEG and ELEG majors. The senior design course is your designated 'Discovery Learning Experience' which is a university requirement for graduation.

Q: Can I get a bachelor's degree and master's degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering in 5 years?

A: If you are up to the challenge, yes! The MS Degree (non-thesis program) requires 10 courses beyond the undergraduate work. Two things allow you to design a 5-year program: (1) With permission and prerequisites, you can take two graduate courses while still an undergraduate. (2) You can take 4 courses a term as a graduate student. It is not for the faint of heart, but it is allowed and doable. A 5-year program requires advanced planning. You should start discussing it with your advisor at the end of your sophomore year. Consult the catalog and department web page about the 4+1 program. If you are interested in the thesis program, you must complete six additional ELEG 869 Master's Thesis credits. NOTE: a graduate course taken in place of a related undergraduate course to meet a major requirement cannot also count toward the graduate program.


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