Spotlight :: ECE :: UD :: <IBM Donates Equipment Kolodzey>
ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Spotlight

Dr. James Kolodzey, Charles Black Evans Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

The EDXRF can be used to determine the chemical composition of novel semiconductor alloys and structures.

The CVD device has the ability to grow layers of thin films of semiconductor materials for devices and circuits.

Donated equipment supports student research, learning in engineering

----Equipment donated to the University of Delaware's College of Engineering by technology giant IBM is advancing student research efforts toward fabricating and characterizing electronic materials and devices.The instruments, an energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) system and a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system, collectively worth about $150,000, were given to James Kolodzey, Charles Black Evans Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Kolodzey explains that because the two devices measure and fabricate a wide range of materials, the acquisition benefits not only electrical engineering faculty and students, but the whole college.

“These new systems will solidify and expand the opportunities for research at UD and will enhance the sharing of results with industry,” says Kolodzey, whose research interests lie on the characteristics and limitations of nanoelectronic devices operating at high speeds and in combination with different material systems.

First used in the laboratory of Mary Zaitz at IBM's East Fishkill facility, the EDXRF system will be used to determine the chemical composition of novel semiconductor alloys and structures, and to calibrate the operating conditions for epitaxial growth systems.

The CVD device, with its ability to grow layers of thin films of semiconductor materials for devices and circuits, will enable researchers in Kolodzey's laboratory to produce and study novel experimental materials such as the carbon compound graphene, which is not yet used in standard practice.

“Homemade” by researchers including Jack Chu of IBM's TJ Watson Research Center, the CVD device includes unique features such as a 5-inch diameter quartz reaction chamber, a high temperature furnace, components for controlling the flow of process gases and vacuum pumps for their evaluation.

Students learned to operate the advanced instruments from Thomas Adam, senior scientist at IBM's Nanotechnology Center, who organized the donation. They will work with Kolodzey to install the equipment at UD and collaborate with UD faculty and IBM senior scientists in future measurements.

The equipment will be located in DuPont Hall, rooms 105 and 242.

For more information, contact Kolodzey at [kolodzey@ee.udel.edu].

Article by Karen B. Roberts


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